Genre: Action
Premise: After a military helicopter pilot is badly injured, the U.S. Government turns him into the most highly evolved human, and most dangerous weapon, on the planet.
About: Wahlberg’s supposedly been looking for a big franchise for awhile now. And The Six Billion Dollar Man (an upgrade of the 1970s TV series, The Six Million Dollar Man) appears to be it. The script here is written by Argentinian Damian Szifron, who will be making his American writing-directing debut with this film.
Writer:Damian Szifron
Details: 124 pages

Mark Wahlberg

Normally, you wouldn’t see me reviewing a Mark Wahlberg vehicle. Wahlberg and I have been on shaky ground ever since he voiced his life-long dislike for Star Wars. Until he calls me up to apologize, I’m staying away from his projects.

But today’s script is different. That’s because it’s written by Damian Szifron. Szifron wrote and directed one of my favorite movies of 2015, Wild Tales, a wacky and wonderful collection of short films that’s unlike anything you’ve seen. Seriously, go rent it right now.

Color me curious, then, how he ended up on this project. Despite the greatness of Wild Tales, there was nothing in the film that indicated he’s the right guy to write a great big Hollywood action film.

And my skepticism wasn’t helped when I opened the script file, which boasted an entire screenplay in the wrong font. But I’m trying to stay optimistic. I just put a script in my Top 25 that was 73 pages long. Who’s to say a wrong-fonted script couldn’t follow suit? Let’s find out.

Steve Austin is a 25 year-old crop duster when two 767s hit the Twin Towers in New York. Steve, inspired by his father, joins the military to go into Iraq and Murica some ter-rists!

But during his first mission, piloting a Blackhawk helicopter, he’s shot down and assumed dead. That is until Steve wakes up 15 years later on a hospital bed with a whole bunch of scientists looking down at him.

Steve’s new friends inform him he’s been injected with six billion (with a “B”) dollars worth of upgrades, making him the single most expensive soldier in the world. After a cool little montage of Steve learning all his new abilities (yes, his high jumping power is featured prominently), he’s sent on his very first mission, where he rescues a bunch of hostages from some terrorists.

Steve’s feeling conflicted about his new job though, particularly the fact that he’s lost all his freedom in what’s supposed to be the freest nation in the world. That sounds a bit Murica backwards to me.

And when Steve falls in love with a lovely bookstore owner, Miriam, she only reinforces this idea. In fact, she does some research on the corporation that’s turned Steve into a weapon, only to find out they’re connected to some Nazi scientists who were doing experiments on Jews in World War 2!

So Steve’s going to have to make a tough decision. Does he keep working for the company that’s helping keep the country safe? Or does he expose them for the morally suspect practices they endorse?

I feel sorry for true artists who are pulled into the Hollywood system.

This industry has a way of neutralizing everything that made them stand out in the first place.

It’s like if Miles Davis were asked to play trumpet in a pop band. The second he started riffing into one of his legendary improvisations, they’d turn to him and say, “Yo Miles! Just play the fucking song.”

That feels like what’s going on here with Szifron.

With that said, Szifron isn’t completely free from criticism here.

Some of the dialogue in this script is tough to read, with a lot of the early stuff being achingly on-the-nose. For example, an early conversation between Steve and his dad reads like this: “I want to be proud of myself, dad. Take a risk for once in my life.” “Then go all in, do it. Apply to NASA!” “Not with my grades. I’ll never get in.”

With that said, nobody’s coming to this movie to hear great dialogue. Most people come to big Hollywood movies for one reason and one reason only: to see them deliver on the promise of their premise.

What that means is, Six Billion Dollar Man is about a man who has six billion dollars worth of weapons-related enhancements in his body. People are coming to that film to see fresh, cool, original body-weapon-enhancement shit that they’ve never seen before. As long as you give the audience that which you promised? They’ll give you a feee pass on dicey dialogue and problematic plotting.

Unfortunately for Six Billion Dollar Man, it’s entering the market during the golden age of comic book movies, a world where EVERY SINGLE WRITER is trying to come up with fresh, cool, original body-weapon-enhancement shit. And in many ways, those writers have it easier. Cause they can draw on supernatural abilities. The Six-Billion Dollar Man has to keep its powers grounded.

Enhanced eye sight? Enhanced jumping-power? Enhanced hearing? A really strong arm? Am I paying 20 bucks to see these things?

I don’t want to go on one of my big rants here. But the proof is in the pudding. Stale concepts lead to stale execution. You can’t find original scenes and set pieces inside of ideas that have been done to death. I mean how many original ways can you write a spy-like character, even one with powers, taking down a group of terrorists?

They’ve all been done before. I challenge you. Right now. Come up with a terrorist take-down that’s never been done before. You can’t do it. Because you’re competing against too many shows and movies that have covered the same ground.

Contrast this with a movie like Inception. Inception had all these weird original scenes (people fighting each other in a gravity-shifting environment) because the concept itself was weird and original. When you start from a place of uniqueness, you open up a sort of “unique porthole,” which gives you access to scenes that nobody’s seen before because nobody’s bothered to go down those roads yet.

The only time unoriginal concepts work is when the director has some sort of unique stylistic take. John Wick is a good example. If you dress that movie down, it was one of a thousand guy-with-a-gun movies. But the directors had a really cool style and were able to use that style to cover up the script’s weaknesses. If you doubt that, talk to anyone who read the script before it was made. Many people considered it one of the worst scripts of the year. I mean, a guy goes on a Russia Mafia revenge trip because of a dog.

I should also point out to studios that if you’re going to revive old IP, you don’t want it to be the kind of IP that has inspired dozens of ripoffs in the years since it came out. I mean everything from Robocop to Deadpool has been using the genetically enhanced human being thing. If you’re going to come in after those updates, you’re going to have to update your own IP to a place where it feels fresh and different. And, unfortunately, Six Billion Dollar Man didn’t do that.

The script does start to ask some challenging questions about personal freedom in its later chapters but, again, that’s not why we come to see The Six Billion Dollar Man. We come to see The Six Billion Dollar Man to see six billion dollar set pieces. Shit that nobody’s ever done on screen. And I didn’t see that here.

I do want to give credit to Szifron for one thing before I end this review though. He wrote the best tongue-in-cheek line in a script I’ve read all year. Here he is describing Miriam, the bookstore character Steve falls in love with.

“Because she’s kind and lovely and has been cast perfectly in the role, we love this woman.”

[ ] What the hell did I just read?
[x] wasn’t for me
[ ] worth the read
[ ] impressive
[ ] genius

What I learned: There’s some IP that carries well over time, and some that doesn’t. Action IP does not. What was interesting action-wise 40 years ago is not interesting today. Which means if you’re going to mine IP that old, you have to completely reinvent the character. In contrast, horror IP travels well. What was scary 40 years ago can still be scary today. Case in point. “It.”

  • Poe_Serling

    Talk about a fast and furious Monday post…

    In Carson’s best monotone voice:

    We now return to ScriptShadow to its normal programming.

    • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

      I remember when the “The Six Million Dollar Man” series was winding down he had a run-in with Big Foot. Not enough Big Foot stories these days…

      • PQOTD

        ‘Cos Big Foot’s a shy and retiring wuss next to Hellpig.

        • Marija ZombiGirl

          Ohman, a “versus” movie? SyFy, get on this PRONTO!!
          Hellpig vs Bigfoot!

          • Poe_Serling

            Here’s a thought…

            What if Bigfoot made a guest appearance as one of the
            woodland creatures in the story line from yesterday’s
            project?

            Then the audience knows for sure that the playbook has
            been thrown out.

            ;-)

          • brenkilco

            Bert the pig: ‘You’re just not a wartime consigliere, Sasquatch.’

          • PQOTD

            Lol.

      • hickeyyy

        Bigfoot will be showing up around here soon…

        • Poe_Serling

          Promises, promises.

          ;-)

      • Poe_Serling

        The Six Million Dollar Man vs. Bigfoot

        On the small screen … that was an event!

        Plus, Lee Majors’ TV star power kept him busy over the
        course of several decades.

        The Big Valley, Owen Marshall: Counselor at Law, The
        Six Million Dollar Man, The Fall Guy, and so on.

  • klmn

    Carson, do you know it’s National Cheeseburger Day – and you missed most of it. You’ve only got a couple hours left.

  • klmn

    Six billion dollars? No man is worth that much – and few women.

    I think a line like that was said on the old Barney Miller show by Abe Vigoda (as Fish).

  • Justin

    Six billion dollars is just too much to spend on a single person or weapon — especially one with a mind (unless they went in the RoboCop direction). I get what they were trying to go for, but six billion dollars? Really? Six million dollars, sure. Six hundred million dollars, even… why not?

    But six billion dollars seems almost wasteful. Gotta tone it down.

    • PQOTD

      Six billion’ll get you a Nimitz-class aircraft carrier and a nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine, or an aircraft carrier like the Ronald Reagan.

      • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

        The (intended) pun was fantastic and appreciated.

        Speaking of science, I am starting a re-read of Kim Stanley Robinson’s Mars trilogy. James Cameron developed a TV show based on the books that never made it past the script phase due to cost of filming each episode. With CGI and what-not getting cheaper, I can only hope that Cameron returns to the project and gets it moving. It would make for excellent television.

        • PQOTD

          Can’t recall if I’ve ever read them. I used to read a lot of sci-fi but time rarely permits these days. I’ll certainly seek them out and see if the first few pages rings a bell. It certainly sounds good and if anyone can pull it off, Cameron could.

          I absolutely meant the pun about NASA: Congress keeps cutting their budget but they find ways to build terrific probes cheaper. Of all the (good) things the United States has given to humanity, I love NASA the best. I was watching a doco on Cassini last night. It may take up to a century to wade through all of its data. Extraordinary organization packed with extraordinary people.

          • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

            I checked Amazon and they don’t even have the first pages for free in their Amazon viewer. Maybe Kindle has a sample…

            Agree on NASA. I wish we put more money into it. Imagine what they could do.

          • Jaws

            Nasa budgets keep getting cut because we don’t need to spend ridiculous amounts of money on what is now ancient technology. We’ve reversed engineered alien technology now. We can’t get it to be quite as optimized as the ETs have it, but we can get it working pretty close. We’ve had anti-grav tech for going on 50 years, maybe much longer. We can zip to the moon and back in highly advanced ships in the blink of an eye and at a much lesser cost of putting fuel in a standard rocket. Of course, these technologies are highly secretive. If we didn’t have them, Nasa would still be highly unfunded, if not more so. But we do have them, so there is no real need to pump money into Nasa. Nasa is now just a public front.

    • Scott Crawford

      It’s not just the cost of the hardware, it’s the amount they’ve spent on development, all the prototypes, the cost of the factory, the staff’s wages, electricity, tea bags, etc.

      Seriously, look at any FAILED Pentagon project.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M247_Sergeant_York

      $3.97 billion to develop a moving anti-aircraft gun! A scandal (literally).

      • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

        ….OR… the Pentagon could just say they are failed when in fact they are fully armed and operational.

        Or they are just failed.

    • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

      They paid government prices for all of the components, so the actual cost is hovering around $100k.

    • Citizen M

      It’s not that you don’t know shit about weapons, you don’t know shit about inflation. They are going to have to inflate the dollar to pay back the trillions of national debt, like Hitler did with the German Mark.

  • Doug

    I thought Wild Tales had some good stories, but like most anthologies it was let down by some seriously dull bits. Still, the best Argentinian film I’ve seen in years :-)

  • James Michael

    Mark Walhberg is too short to be the 6 Billion Dollar Man. He’s not even the six foot man (sorry for the terrible joke)

    But seriously, he’s short and pretty old now. If this movie got made, believing that they would choose him may be the least believable thing in the entire film.

  • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

    HUGE fan of Mark Wahlberg. THAT guy has come a long way. Everyone should check out his wikipedia page. FASCINATING stuff. Especially the dark stuff BEFORE he broke in…

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Wahlberg

    The way Mark has grown his brand and expanded his skill base is a-mazing.

    Still, I’d be lying if I said I thought a reboot of the “Six Million Dollar Man” was a good idea. That said, IF Mark Wahlberg stared in it I’d hafta go see it. I’m such a fanboy. Ever since “TED” he won me over; the man can do no wrong.

    America needs stars like Mark Wahlberg doing well. Post-Transformers I hope he finds what he’s looking for; whether he’s looking to challenge himself creatively OR just continue to do “BIG” movies and rake in the dough.

    I think Mark Wahlberg can do anything: comedy, drama, headline action movies. Shit, the guy’s working on a restaurant line now, doing commercials with P.Diddy Combs. He’s all over the place. If you can keep up with the man, you’re doing better than me!!

    EVERYONE on this site should follow Mark Wahlberg on Twitter too. Mark’s pretty active active, and his content (for a movie star) is varied and good.

    Okay, man-crush over, back to your regularly scheduled program, besides I gotta go to bed.

    • HRV

      You think maybe this is why Carson doesn’t like you? I don’t comment much on the forum — I save my writing for my screenplays — but I might be in the same boat as I can’t get my AOWs listed either. Of course that would defeat the purpose of having forums where people can express their opinions.

      • Scott Crawford

        Tip: send Carson your logline and he’ll tell you what’s wrong with it. Costs a pony. THEN more likely to pick your logline since he helped you with it.

        • HRV

          So, we have to pay to play?

          • Scott Crawford

            No, it’s not PAYOLA! But people have had their loglines fixed often find they attract more attention. Also, you say you don’t post much. Post much. Get an online presence. Get people excited about reading YOUR screenplays.

            Just my advice.

          • Adam McCulloch

            Honestly, HRV, I agree with Scott. The Script Shadow peeps are super smart and I realize it can be a daunting feeling stacking your comments against theirs but it’s very worthwhile getting involved.

            I have had the good fortune of having a couple of screenplays make the AOW list and really didn’t make use of it first time round. I was an idiot, I know, and I made some really dumb errors to start with which was why I decided to get more involved myself. If everyone else can see what I’m doing wrong but I can’t, then I need to hang with these people so I can see it myself.

            Even just he simultaneous reading of a script and formulating your own opinions and then being able to compare them to others is invaluable. Even just thinking about a new script every day will make you better.

            Yes, you’ll get torn to shreds but you’ll also get feedback that will make you better and that’s what we all want in the end.

            Don’t be discouraged. Post your logline here in a new message asking for feedback. We’ll shed you… I mean provide constructive feedback.

          • HRV

            I agree, there are some knowledgeable forum members. But again, I’m more of a listener than a talker. I’ve written a number of scripts and every time I have tried to get feedback on here it’s been met with a barrage of negativity. I joined this forum looking for positive/constructive feedback. I’m sure others are here for that reason as well, but most of the time we wallow in negativity. I’ve lived my life dealing with negative people, so I can handle it, I just don’t feel I should always have to — it gets old. I’m going to post two loglines for the same script up top. Let the “shredding” begin.

          • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry
          • Adam McCulloch

            Thanks EC.

          • PQOTD

            Holy mackerel – I find myself inexplicably upvoting you for that one, EC.

          • HRV

            The pay-to-play was just an of the cuff remark. Hey, I can be controversial.
            I post when I can, but I’m not a verbose person by nature, so you won’t find me listing long comments – usually curt one liners. It’s also a matter of time. If I’m going to judge someone’s work, I’d prefer to read the whole script, but that’s time consuming. I usually have more time in the winter.

        • JasonTremblay

          Hopefully Carson does pick it. Should be good for a laugh. LOL

      • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

        I let people speak for themselves. A lot of times I throw things out there HOPING for a bone. Most times I don’t get it.

    • JasonTremblay

      Wahlberg is vile. A terrible actor, a religious zealot, a convicted racist criminal, and as dumb as a bag of rocks.

      Ted was funny, though.

      • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

        Very mean things to say. IMO you need to start reading the bible and change your worldview, it’s very negatively slanted.

        As far as Mark’s past. He’s overcome all that. One of the cool things about studying a persons bio over time is to see how they mature and grow. People don’t stay the same forever. And I marvel at how Mark has changed for the better.

        Sorry to read you’re still in judgement mode. Mark’s acting range has grown in spades; he’s getting better with time. Just look at the trailer for “Daddy’s Home 2″. Tough guy to comedic bend. Very well acted.

        How is Mark Wahlberg “dumb as a box of rocks”? I await your response, it should be good for a laugh.

        • JasonTremblay

          Anyone who tells someone to read the Bible is the epitome of judgemental. Keep your superstitions to yourself. Wahlberg blinded someone in a racist attack. He’s made many racist comments. To this day, he’s made numerous homophobic remarks, including calling one of the most acclaimed films of all time, Brokeback Mountain, “creepy.” He says he runs all his choices for roles past his priest. How nutty is that? Apparently that priest had no trouble giving a thumbs up for Wahlberg to play a porn star with a 10-inch dong.

          Like Wahlberg, your post proves how hypocritical religious nuts are. Your posts here are so self-absorbed as to be vomit-inducing. Go away.

          • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

            No, cuing someone to read the bible is NEVER judgemental, it’s the right thing to do. The bible is the ultimate source of truth. A great foundation and basis for civil law.

            You are stuck is a bias state of mind, Jason Tremblay. My comments vs. yours provide a nice contrast in two different ways of viewing the world. Knowing the Lord allows a person to take a much deeper worldview. Why? Because the Lord is deep. You need to find out for yourself. Read the bible and find out what God is like.

          • JasonTremblay

            Sorry. I’m too busy sacrificing virgins to volcano gods.

          • PQOTD

            What did virgins ever do to you, Jason?

          • JasonTremblay

            Nothing. No matter how much I begged.

          • PQOTD

            PMSL.

          • PQOTD

            Just out of curiosity, EC, do you eat ham and bacon? Pork chops and ribs? Pork roasts?

            Do you throw around a football made from the skin of the swine with your son? Wear shoes or a belt, or own a wallet made from pigskin?

            Because Leviticus says you shouldn’t do any of that.

            If I had a dollar for every ‘True Believer’ who chose to ignore those particular admonitions, I’d be very wealthy. Like Oprah wealthy.

          • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

            When it comes to applying the bible to your life, you need to use COMMON SENSE. The Holy Father is not a God of fools. A) You should treat Him AND the bible with the utmost of respect. Your approach is COMPLETELY WRONG!!

            A lot of the old Testament law was for the safely of a primitive people. All the the sacrifice, however, is supposed to point you to Jesus. He is the reverse of the curse.

            My approach angle with the bible is 100% correct. You wanna know why? Because I read it to learn, love, appreciate, and grow in my relationship to God. Under Him, NEVER above Him. I don’t not nit pick and fault find like you do. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, fools despise wisdom and instruction.

          • PQOTD

            I’ll take that as a ‘Yes’ then.

            The reason I ask, EC, is not to “nit pick and find fault”. Where I live (Australia), we’re currently going through a very spiteful debate about whether LGBTQ folk should be able to marry the person they love more than life itself.

            And most of those who are saying, “No, they shouldn’t” are using Scripture (particularly the Book of Leviticus) as the basis for their disagreement.

            So I’m naturally curious… On a post last week, you made a comment that the Bible was the word of God.

            If that’s really true (and I don’t doubt for a moment that you’re absolutely sincere in your belief that it is – I’m honestly not trying to disparage your faith here, just to understand), then why is it that some people can ignore some of those words with impunity, and pick and choose which words they ignore, but then apply other words dogmatically to other people whose proclivities they don’t understand or agree with?

            I don’t understand why that’s okay, or who gets to choose which words of God they abide by, and which can be safely ignored.

            I’ve been in that kind-of relationship – committed to each other, forsaking all others, for better and for worse, in sickness and in health, etc, etc, and the only thing that was any different was we didn’t have children. It was in every sense a marriage but without a certificate and a walk down the aisle. My sister and her partner are in that position, and I have other friends who are, too.

          • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

            Homosexuality is shunned in the bible in more places than just the book of Leviticus. It’s brought up again in the book of Revelation probably because of the times we’re in right now, and I think Paul mentions it in one of his letters as well. The real key is: how will you justify yourself before God. Your vision is too horizontal (the laws and times of man in the here and now), not vertical (with a heart’s attitude of a love for God who is eternal and never changes).

            Jesus trumps the Old Testament. He came because the Holy Father knows how prone we are to sin, so He took care of that through faith in His son, who is the 2nd Adam.

            As far as what to key on in the bible and what to ignore, that’s easy: it’s all important and reveals things about God, but there are DEFINITELY some things that are more important than others. Of most importance is faith in Jesus Christ. That’s the purpose of the bible: so you know God and see your need for Him. Get saved. It’s not hard.

          • Dude…

            “Read the bible.”

            “You are stuck in a bias state of mind.”

            It’s almost like you have no self-awareness.

          • Justin

            Telling someone to read the Bible isn’t judgmental. Telling them to read it because their life is wrong or some other judgement reason is.

            You probably won’t, but I’d suggest watching the video “The Gift of the Bible” (or whatever it’s called) from Penn, a widely known atheist. There’s no judgement in there — he explains it very clearly.

            Anyway, that’s enough from me. Commenting on a religious debate on the internet is the worst idea ever.

          • JasonTremblay

            Telling someone to read the Bible is downright silly. Why not Mein Kampf or Harry Potter? Actually I’d rather read Harry Potter. It’s better written and far more believable.

          • Kirk Diggler

            “Apparently that priest had no trouble giving a thumbs up for Wahlberg to play a porn star with a 10-inch dong.”

            Just for the record, it was 13. And I’m sure the priest was okay with it as long as he got to watch.

          • JasonTremblay

            I didn’t count the tip.

          • El_CapitanMorgan

            The guy above you has to be a troll. No way that’s real.

          • wlubake

            I don’t think so. He’d have to be the most dedicated troll ever. He comments regularly on the posts here. He’s just a guy who admires Mark Wahlberg.

          • JasonTremblay

            Troll. Christian Taliban. Tomato. Potato.

      • Citizen M

        Go on, say that to his face. I dare you.

  • Omoizele Okoawo

    Kill Bill is technically a remake of Charlie’s Angels. All it takes for a hero to be brought back is finding a good story to put them in.

    The original Six Million Dollar man is being retired and replaced with a Six Billion Dollar Cyborg Anti-Terrorist Team Six (6 Billion Dollar CATS!). A group of Russian cyber terrorists begins a take over of the neural net that controls the data that the squad gets. When they are done they will send the squad to destroy any target they choose. The only person who can penetrate the compromised cyborg launch base and stop this from happening is the original Six Million Dollar Man who isn’t WiFi enabled so is unaffected by the hack. With a couple upgrades and maybe some help from the Six Million Dollar Woman, they try to stop the terrorists before they can send the 6 Billion Dollar CATS to kill the President, or bang Milenia Trump, or whatever the Macguffin is.

    This way the fact that Marl Wahlberg is older actually plays into it. And you have the background of the covert operative cyborg world to deal with that’s been around since whenever the 6MDM was on the air.

  • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

    This project has been tossed to writers for as long as I’ve been on the interweb. One of the first online movie news stories I read was Kevin Smith signing on to write the script and possibly direct. (for the kids out there, this was when most websites were plain text with one, maybe two if you were lucky, pictures per page).

    • Malibo Jackk

      Even a blind studio exec can occasionally find a bone.

      • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

        What amazes me is how often they return to old IP (like this tv show) and keep rewriting it and rewriting it. The show wasn’t that good to begin with!

        Have some courage and give life to a forgotten great script that someone else shepherded through development years ago, and won’t need expensive rewrite after rewrite because they’ve already been done!

  • Lucid Walk

    OT: Does anyone have a copy of Ballerina, that action spec Carson gave an impressive for last week?

    • Jarrean

      What’s your email?

      • Lucid Walk
        • Scott Crawford

          Sent!

          • Lucid Walk

            Much appreciated

          • Adam McCulloch

            I only just got to reading it yesterday so went back and looked at the comments. I’d be interested to hear what you thought about it.

          • Jarrean

            Scott, do you have the Transformers (2007) script?

          • Scott Crawford

            No, sorry.

  • Citizen M

    Combine the Six Million Dollar Man and Pretty Woman.

    THE SIX MILLION DOLLAR HO
    A prostitute fitted with prosthetic enhancements must replace the sex doll of a Russian computer genius and get him to reveal how he hacked the US election.

  • hickeyyy

    How would I freshen this up? We’re going comedy. Give it the 21 Jump Street

    We’re not rebooting this. We’re not giving him a son. Let’s play on the fact that everyone knows this is a dated idea. That superheroes have stolen the opportunity for this to be a relevant concept like you mentioned since the powers are no longer cutting it.

    What if we have an old-man actor take the role? The Six Billion Dollar man is no longer a hero, but he is living in a retirement home. There is an abusive orderly that he wants to stop, but most of his 6 billion dollar parts are in disarray and no longer functional. With the help of a sexiest old woman in the home, they have to fix his biotic parts in order for him to finally fight back against the abuse they’ve all received at the hands of the orderly.

    You could make that cheap while still getting the IP and name recognition.

    Just a thought.

    • Scott Crawford

      Like THIS:

      http://scriptshadow.net/screenplay-review-the-40000-man/

      Wasn’t Alex “Downsizing” Payne once attached to this?

      • hickeyyy

        Oh wow. That’s great. I like that one much better than my idea. I’m over here lagging behind.

        Not only that, I commented on this review. Man, funny how you forget these things. I don’t even remember reading it.

        • Scott Crawford

          I want to see them replace ONE leg with a bionic leg and leave the other one… and running around in circles. Or he stares to run and his leg rips off… which is what would happen.

          • hickeyyy

            Maybe his bionic eye can only see black and white?

          • Adam McCulloch

            He needs to reboot in safe mode and won’t kill the bad guys as a result.

          • hickeyyy

            Now that’s a genius idea.

          • Adam McCulloch

            Maybe he’s a pacifist like The Dude so his humanity is in complete conflict with his warmongering operating system. = The Six Billion Dollar Dude.

          • Scott Crawford

            No, no, he can’t tell the difference between colors. Which makes him less predjudiced but shit at catching crooks.

            Mind you:

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqHlIRZnF38

  • https://twitter.com/deanmaxbrooks deanb

    Super soldier. Nazis. Conspiracy. Spying. Soldier waking up years later in a strange new world inhospitable to his values.

    Captain America: Wahlberg Soldier

  • Adam McCulloch

    I agree completely with Hickeyy. Comedy is the route here. An enhanced man who short circuits at the crucial moment, or who rips the door off the car because his strength hasn’t been calibrated correctly has far more potential. Six Million Dollar Man was written in an era when we were in thrall to new technology. Nowadays, many people feel frustrated by it not working properly. I can already see the scene where Six Billion Dollar Man has to spend all day at the Mac store to get fixed.

  • Devil.Fear.Dark.TRIO.GO

    Speaking of Mark Wahlberg, any update insider info on Disciple Program?

  • HRV

    Hey guys, need some feedback on a logline for a current screenplay. here are two versions:
    A WORLD WAR TWO BUFF IS SMITTEN BY A MYSTERIOUS, BEAUTIFUL FRENCH RESISTANCE FIGHTER AFTER SEEING HER IN A COLLECTION OF OLD PHOTOGRAPHS HE ACQUIRES, BUT IT’S WHAT ELSE HE FINDS THAT ALLOWS HIM GO BACK IN TIME TO HELP HER FIGHT A DETERMINED SS CAPTAIN.

    A WORLD WAR TWO ENTHUSIAST ACQUIRES A COLLECTION WHICH INCLUDES A PHOTOGRAPH OF A BEAUTIFUL FRENCH RESISTANCE FIGHTER AND A MYSTERIOUS RING THAT PERMITS TIME TRAVEL. HE FIGURES OUT HOW THE RING WORKS; BUT WILL THE WOMAN LIKE HIM, THE FRENCH ACCEPT HIM, AND CAN HE STAY ALIVE WHILE KEEPING THE RING’S POWER A SECRET AND OUT OF GERMAN HANDS?
    I know some people don’t like upper case — no, I’m not yelling — that’s just how I have the loglines listed in my file. I actually write my first drafts in upper case, because it’s easier to read since I print small — to match typing font.

    • Scott Crawford

      The ideas solid. Prefer the first logline. Sure we could get it shorter. Give us time.

      • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

        Scott, you are a writer’s best friend. They need to make a pocket book version of you that all of us pre-pro’s out there can carry along with us for times like this.

        • HRV

          Hey E.C. this came about because of your comment yesterday.

          • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

            Which was…

          • HRV

            The remark about not being liked.

          • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

            When you reference what a person says–and take issue with it–you should quote that and NOT make vague referrals back to earlier posts. A lot of stuff gets said on this boards. You’re still being to vague.

          • HRV

            I didn’t take issue with it. Just commented on it. I did a quick back check but couldn’t find it and I have to excuse myself for the time being — got some driving etc. to do.

      • Scott Crawford

        After falling in love with photographs of a French resistance heroine, a WWII buff finds a way to travel back in time and save her from the SS.

        But are there consequences to changing history? Could host be put in the logline?

        • HRV

          You can’t change history when your prepresence has already been accounted for.

          • Scott Crawford

            Fair enough! Feels like it needs a LITTLE bit more in the logline, one missing element of stakes, conflict, or a time limit. Something to make it seem more URGENT.

            Think about the blurb on the back of an airport novel. It’s all about the URGENCY. What must happen, why, and what the consequence of success or failure might be.

            We can do this!

          • HRV

            That’s what makes it difficult for others to help with a logline — they don’t know the intricacies of the story.

          • Scott Crawford

            Yeah, but YOU do. It needs ONE more thing… irony, a complication. Guy travels back in time BUT…

            Everything he thought he knew about WWII he got wrong.

            The woman is really a double agent.

            He’s circumcised.

            But those are just MY ideas, off the top of my meds. You need to sacrifice some of your secrets to make the pitch a bit more juicy.

          • HRV

            The second Logline noted problems he has to face. Heck, just the fact that he’s going to fight the Germans with the French resistance makes the story rife with possible complications.

          • Scott Crawford

            But -and I’m pushing you because I think you’re underselling this – all those points are obvious. Of COURSE fighting the Nazis is going to be tough. What’s different?

            If Carson has read your logline and said NAH! and instead picked Hellpig and Meat, it’s probably because it just doesn’t quite jump off the page.

            Now you may say, well why don’t people just read my script and they’ll see it’s good. Thing is, my experience, if a writer can’t sell the script in a logline, chances are the script won’t do much either. Most of the time.

            So let’s play the odds and fix the logline. Carson can help, but like ALL of us, he can only work with what he has been given. So far nothing you’ve given us NOTHING that ANYONE who was asked to write a time traveling World War Two script would do.

            So… what’s DIFFERENT in YOUR script? Irony, conflict, an interesting character flaw, something else from YOUR script… a trailer moment, something you’re willing to share with people to get them interested.

            Best of luck!

          • HRV

            Thanks, the trick is squeezing what would be more like a synopsis into a logline.

          • Adam McCulloch

            So maybe that’s the twist. He can save her but it means his ancestors have to die and he would no longer exist. Maybe the reason he is so into WWII is because his family say they were resistance fighters but maybe they were traitors or something. Back to the Future meets Schindler’s List.

          • Adam McCulloch

            I know it’s not necessarily what you wrote but loglines are great like that: they help you distill the story essence and see if there is some big or alternate idea you might be leaving on the table.

          • HRV

            The element of changing the future is so cliche I decided to not make that a major factor. But that doesn’t mean he can’t die in the past. Also, I use the characters actions/thoughts as a means to explain their situation.

    • Citizen M

      Personally I hate time travel movies. Why can’t you set the whole thing during WW2? For instance, “An Englishman obsesses about the beautiful French Resistance fighter who helped him escape via Dunkirk. He joins the OSS and parachutes into France, determined to find her, but a ruthless SS Captain stands in his way.”

      • Scott Crawford

        To be fair, it’s his screenplay, that’s what he’s written, let’s work with what he’s got rather than send him back to the typewriter to do something else!

        • HRV

          See what I mean about negativity? To me the time travel element makes it more interesting.

          • Scott Crawford

            Yeah! I do!

          • Citizen M

            Who’s being negative, me or Scott? I took the core of your story and tweaked it a bit, removing what I thought was the weakest element. I regard that as being positive and helpful.

            If I’d said, really crap idea, too expensive too produce, people are sick of Nazis find a new villain, etc etc, that would be negative. But I didn’t say that.

    • Adam McCulloch

      This is what I had but Scott’s is way better.

      “After a nebbish history buff finds a mysterious box of WWII paraphernalia, he discovers a ring which enables him to go back in time and save a beautiful resistance fighter from the evil SS captain who brutally murdered her.”

      I would suggest adding the flaw to the logline. If he’s nebbish then he has to man up to save the girl. I would also make the connection between the SS Captain and the girl more threatening. I don’t know if he did kill her but this feels right to me. Maybe you don’t need to reveal the SS Captain is also after the ring in the logline as it is not the protagonist’s desire line.

    • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

      For what it’s worth, I like Adam McCulloch’s take on the logline. Sounds like an interesting story and looking forward to checking it out sometime!

      • HRV

        Carson has it. If he includes it in an AOW you’ll all be able to read it.

    • Jaco

      I’m being serious here – I can’t read these because they are uppercase. As in literally can’t – my eyes start on the first word and then immediately jump to the end. So all I’m reading is A . . . Captain. A . . . Hands? It’s like a bad ee cummings poem.

      I’d be happy to read them if you got rid of the uppercase. Who knows, I may be the only one with this condition of being unable to read ALLCAPS, but, if I am not, you are doing yourself a huge disservice by not making the loglines as reader-friendly as possible.

      • HRV

        That’s funny. I’ll make adjustments.

      • Adam McCulloch

        Every industry has their standard formatting. It might not be how you or I like to work but, if you don’t use it, then people assume you are not professional.

        Fiction writing is double spaced, times new roman, 12 point, no double spaces between sentences, indented pars etc.
        https://www.shunn.net/format/story.html

        I write all my fiction single spaced but I would never submit to a literary magazine without converting it to the Shunn format.

        There are plenty of rules worth breaking but I just don’t feel that formatting is one of them.

        • Jaco

          Yes – if the loglines above are being submitted to Carson in ALLCAPS, could be why he’s not selecting them.

          • HRV

            Personally I’d call that nit-picking, but whatever. I’ll submit the next ones in lower caps.

    • HRV

      Thanks for the feedback. I’ll make up some more loglines.

    • wlubake

      When a WW2 enthusiast discovers a ring that allows him to time travel, he journeys to occupied France to win the affections of a beautiful resistance fighter he has long admired and risks exposing the powerful ring to Nazi control, potentially altering the course of history.

      • HRV

        You’ve got it covered except for the “altering the course of history” bit. It makes it sound exciting, but I didn’t want to go that route because I wanted to keep it on a smaller scale involving the couple’s relationship. Thanks

    • Malibo Jackk

      Less is more.
      Can’t really explain it and am sorry to say,
      but I had no interest in what sounded like a silly, long logline.
      But somehow, when reduced down – it sounded intriguing.
      (Could just be me.)

      A WWII buff discovers an old photograph of a beautiful French woman
      and a ring which transports him to the French Resistance.

    • HRV

      A military vehicle restorer finds a ring that transports him back to World War II to help a beautiful French Resistance fighter. Thoughts? (And it’s in lower case)

  • Scott Crawford

    THE CHRONIC BIONIC

    Due to a paperwork mixup, a stoner is given a million-dollar bionic makeover.

    • wlubake

      American Ultra?

  • brenkilco

    So he’s a thousand times more expensive than he was forty years ago. Weimar Germany didn’t have inflation that bad.

    My big problem with that show. When he was supposed to be running. super fast they shot him in slow motion. WTF. Never could get past that. Guess poor Richard Anderson missed his chance for a cameo. RIP

    And since no TVIP is apparently ever too old, obscure or forgotten to inspire Hwood, how about a Voyage To The Bottom of The Sea reboot.

    • klmn

      A Bionic Woman reboot makes more sense than a Six Million Dollar Man.

      More things you can do with women.

      • brenkilco

        Certainly a bigger audience if the character is AC/DC.

    • Thaddeus Arnold

      For a TV from the 70s, I don’t know how you show superspeed any other way than in slo-mo. In fact, using slo-mo to display superspeed is the stand-out effect in superhero films like X-Men Days Of Future Past, Avengers: Age Of Ultron and the upcoming Justice League.

      • Scott Crawford

        Undercrank the camera and use mimes as background characters. Old school!

        • klmn

          God, I hate mimes. They’re just clowns. French clowns.

      • brenkilco

        Yeah, but SMDM wasn’t exactly utilizing bullet time. Just Lee Majors all by his lonesome barely moving.

    • filmklassik

      The series pilot was quite good. The series itself? Not so much. Pretty cheesy, actually. But the 9-year-old me loved it. I even had the action figure.

      And the premise is unbelievably inventive. It’s actually a “my kingdom for an idea that great” premise. And it all started in a novel called Cyborg by a dude named Martin Caiden. He was apparently very prolific and a bit of a Renaissance man. He was also was a flyer who wrote fiction and nonfiction books about aviation, among other works. But I confess I’ve never any of that. But I do know this: He had a hell of an imagination. Just a brilliant, brilliant idea.

    • filmklassik

      Loved the show as a kid, but I’ve seen it lately and it was a cheese fest (though the pilot film is quite good).

      Incredibly ingenious idea though, courtesy of novelist Martin Caiden and his book Cyborg.

  • Andy M (formerly andyjaxfl)

    The Robocop remake was studio noted to death. Joe Carnahan relayed some stories he heard about Padilha’s struggles to make the movie a few years back. It is worth tracking down on Twitter if you have the time. My best guess is that Carnahan posted the info on Twitter about a month or two before the movie came out.

  • Kane

    The original show was pretty goofy but I think it could still work today as a franchise for wahlberg.  Two hurdles first… Why would you spend 6 billion on one soldier?  That is absurd.  I guess they could take the comedy route but that road has been traveled for mediocre results, just watch Inspector Gadget or the Tuxedo.

    The other hurdle is as mentioned before, Steve Austin’s abilities have been surpassed in just about every comic movie lately.  Jumping high and hearing really good just doesn’t cut it for super powers these days.  Which is why they have to tone it down and make it more grounded.  Steve Austin should skew closer to Jason Bourne than to Captain America.  He is a great fighter, with great reflexes, can drive or fly just about anything, but he is an enhanced man not a superhuman.  His character is one that pushes limits even before he gets enhanced.  His drive is to prove that technology and even science are limits for man to push beyond.

    Here is my take: 

    1.        Steve Austin was a test pilot for NASA because that was exotic and exciting in the 70s.  NASA sadly does not excite folks as much these days.  He still needs to be a test pilot.  He should be testing an advanced 6-billion dollar warfighter with synaptic connections.  Pushing it to the limit, he never feels freer than when he is breaking the rules, pissing off the suits and making the craft do incredible things they did not think possible.

    2.       He of course crashes.  He survives just barley, but the synaptic connections have fused to his brain.  Low and behold it gives him augmented technological abilities including the ability to interface with super advance cybernetic limbs.  Unfortunately, his co-pilot and best friend Skip Deadmeat dies in the crash.  This eliminates the why would they spend 6 billion on one guy hurdle. 

    3.       When the secret agency realizes the crash was caused from someone on the inside stealing the technology, Steve becomes a suspect.

    4.       The government can’t just let Steve a potential traitor, go free because of the 6 billion dollars of technology fused to his brain.  Steve is declared dead. 

    5.       Steve is blamed for the crash and becomes a prisoner and a product of the secret government agency, prodded and poked in the name of science as they try to figure out how Steve was able to survive the cybernetic fusion and just how far his abilities can take him. 

    6.       They even go so far as to send him into the field to take down a terrorist cell on his own to test his abilities.  Keeping him on a synaptic tether to keep him from escaping of course.   But Steve, just as he did as a pilot, pushes the technology far beyond the expectations of the scientists.  He redlines his synaptic interfaces at every chance and snaps his tether.  He takes the opportunity to escape briefly just to have a chance to see his former love Jamie Summers who thinks him dead.  Before he can interact, mercenaries take him down and put him on a stronger tether.  This should be brutal and dehumanizing for Steve, a physical manifestation of the bondage and negative impact of technology run amok on humans.   The scientists consider putting him in a permanent coma to ensure continued study and prevent further loss on their investment.

    7.       Simultaneously, the baddies use the stolen technology to take control of military equipment as a show of force and use it to strike targets around the globe.

    8.       Steve’s synaptic bond allows him to triangulate the signal the baddies are using quicker than a super computer and guess the next attack location, since the same code runs through his mind constantly.  He shares this information secretly with that guy that was his handler on the original show and pleads to be released to go find the baddies and avenge his former BFF Deadmeat before he is cybernetically lobotomized.  His handler helps Steve escape.

    9.       Hunted by government mercenaries, Steve’s only chance at true freedom is to find out who was behind the espionage and take back the Mcguffin which will allow him to be free before he is captured and leashed with a permanent tether.

    10.   Spoiler: He succeeds and vanishes ala Jason Borne but keeps in touch with his handler for further adventures.

    That is how I would pitch the franchise.  You are welcome Marky Mark.

    • Omoizele Okoawo

      I like how you made one person getting 6 Billion in enhancements make sense. Very smooth.

    • Kirk Diggler

      “Why would you spend 6 billion on one soldier?”

      There’s always a prototype and they’re very expensive.

      • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

        Funny!

      • Kane

        I can see that protype demo now. Scientist – “Our 6 billion dollar protype can move at 60 mph, see further, hear really well, and open any jar you put in front of him.” Secret agency “we’ll take a refund minus 60k for a car, binoculars, a mic, and a can opener for our agent in the field.”

    • Citizen M

      I’d keep the cyber abilities, like able to hack wirelessly into any network, server, camera footage, radar signals etc, and process the data. But otherwise normal physical abilities.
      THE SIX MILLION MEGABYTE MAN

      • Kane

        Im with ya. Running fast and seeing far may have seemed like cutting edge technology 40 years ago but today cyber abilities make more sense. But id give him at least an enhanced judo chop for the purists.

  • Thaddeus Arnold

    They didn’t even come up with an original take on this IP. The whole “Guy wants to fight for his country, gets enhanced by military, wakes up years later and fights Nazis” sounds ripped straight from Captain America.

  • Buddy

    Why the original Wonder Woman had an “invisible plane” ?
    Why in the original WESTWORLD the hero was SUPPOSED to be a ROBOT ?
    Why Steve Austin was SUPPOSED to have superpowers ?
    BECAUSE at the time THEY HAD NO F VFX AND MONEY. It was action/entertainment for CHEAP.

    40 years later, we can make 300M$ movies if we want too, SO :
    That’s why there’s NO invisible plane in WW’s movie.
    That’s why they SHOW US the robots, in the new WESTWORLD.
    That’s why, there’s no point of seeing a real man playing a robot in 2017…

    • http://insideechenrysbrain.typepad.com/inside_the_brain_of_ec_he/ E.C. Henry

      A while back I sent you my script. Now that you’re back from vacation, did you have a chance to read it…

  • Kirk Diggler

    “Wahlberg’s supposedly been looking for a big franchise for awhile now.”

    So now hat he’s helped turn Transformers into a smaller franchise…..

  • Midnight Luck

    This is why the $40,000 MAN is genius.
    –“if he’s lucky, we can kind of build him slightly stronger, maybe a bit faster, but not really any better” —

    I’d see that 100x over this $6 Trillion dollar man p.o.s. reboot, especially with a Wahlberg.

    So when’s the $40,000 MAN coming out? Won’t somebody buy it and make it? Can’t wait to see the trailer. Hope it is awesome (of course it might be made on a $400 budget, so who knows).

    http://scriptshadow.net/screenplay-review-the-40000-man/#disqus_thread

    • Justin

      Definitely. I’d rather pay $20 to see the $40,000 Man than pay $5 to see $6 Billion Dollar Man. The premise sounds hilarious.

    • Citizen M

      His leg stops working and he has to phone a tech at a call center.
      “Please hold, your call is important to us.”
      “Lady, my leg won’t move but I haveta go to the toilet.”
      “For dysfunctional brain press one.”
      “Lady, it’s my leg. Please, this is urgent.”
      “For hearing and vision problems press two.”
      “My leg! What number for my leg?!”
      “For shoulder problems press three.”
      “For God’s sake… uh, forget it, I need a dry cleaner instead.”
      “For adult diapers press four.”

    • Citizen M

      Just read The Forty Thousand Dollar Man. Really good; fast-paced, funny, very entertaining. Probably a little too over the top to be taken seriously, but a fantastic writing sample.

      Well worth a read. So different from yesterday’s slow-motion thinkpiece. A 2007 Black List script, available here thanks to Scott Crawford: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0BybNvm-CX6dkMnVHN0U4eG95cDg

  • Justin

    Hmm… But what exactly does an averted terrorist attack have to do with a murder charge? The terrorists could have framed her for the murder, but it doesn’t seem like their MO. (Of course, I’m not an expert on terrorism acts).

    And even if it was, the two incidents seem separate in the logline — they don’t tie together. If it was something like “A young mother who unintentionally thwarted a terrorist attack years ago is framed for a bombing incident that claims the life of her ex-husband.” Horrible example, but it should make my point.

    If you could find a way to make those two incidents seem relatable, your logline will be much better.

  • wlubake

    Top 5 Mark Wahlberg performances (IMO), no particular order:

    Fear
    Three Kings
    Departed
    Boogie Nights
    Pain & Gain

    • Justin

      “Four Brothers” is the only Mark Wahlberg movie for me. One of my favorite movies, hands down.

      • Bacon Statham

        Yes! I love that film. You can tell they had a lot of fun making that. It was quite funny and the chemistry between the leads was great.

        • Justin

          Best movie ever!

    • lonestarr357

      Never seen Three Kings, but this is pretty much my list. Much as I love Alan Arkin, I was so disappointed that he didn’t win for The Departed.

      Maybe I’d put I Heart Huckabees for #5.

  • PQOTD

    I’d leave out that the murdered husband is her second. It raises a question about what happened to the first. Personally, I prefer your first logline, but I’d tinker a little:

    When a young mother investigates the mysterious death of her
    husband, she uncovers a terrorists’ revenge conspiracy for a
    school shooting she’d heroically averted years earlier.

    • http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts Eldave1

      This is far better. I would also leave out the mother part and add the agency she worked for. e.g.,

      When a former CIA Agent investigates the mysterious death of her
      husband, she uncovers a terrorists’ revenge conspiracy for a
      school shooting she’d heroically averted years earlier.

  • Justin

    Hmm… It’s better, but now you need to get rid of the unnecessary details to tighten the logline. Is the “nightmares” portion really necessary? It doesn’t tell us much or seem crucial, even. The important parts are “averted terrorist attack” and “framed for murder of her husband.” The fact that it’s her second husband isn’t something we need to know.

    As for the nightmares — what if she developed social phobia or paranoia as a result of the close call instead? That could help the “sanity into question” element seem more believable.

  • Jaco

    A classic non-sequitur type logline . . .I’ve crafted many like this.

    As it reads, the second part of your sentence has nothing to do with the first part. It’s like saying, “A sole survivor tells of the twisty events leading up to a horrific gun battle on a boat, which began when the newly crowned Queen Elsa accidentally uses her power to turn things into ice.” (Sorry, extreme example to illustrate my point).

    Often times, for me, it’s indicative of a larger problem with the script itself – usually a chaotic plot with too many moving parts.

    Distill, distill, distill. You want to make people read the script.

    Best of luck.

  • PQOTD

    Another big earthquake in Mexico with buildings collapsed and dozens killed… Adam McCulloch was there recently. Adam, if you’re still there, are you okay? If there are any other SSers who’re there, are you all okay?

  • http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts Eldave1

    When I hear they are rebooting the $6 million man as a feature it make me want to give up the craft. Jesus Christ.

    • Scott Crawford

      But you do understand WHY they would be interested in the subject matter AND the nostalgia factor. If YOU wrote a cyborg script, and it was GOOD, they’d probably want to slap a name on if people recognise, like Six Million Dollar Man, just as a pirate script became Pirates of the Caribbean or Hardwired became I, Robot (and launched its writers career).

      It’s been happening for years, no need to think about chucking in your dreams for it.

      • http://dlambertson.wix.com/scripts Eldave1

        Yeah, I know why “they” would be interested in the subject matter. (a) They’ll get $200 million in ticket sales here and another $300 million in ticket sales in China alone (b) another $100 million in Six Billion Dollar Man Action Figures and untold amounts from McDonald’s so that they can post the image on the their drink cups (c) the Sequels will sell themselves as well as the potential for the Six Billion Dollar Woman (release date May 2022) and the Twelve Billion Dollar Son (release date sometime in 2024). I can hear the champagne glasses clinking in the studio office from here. And along with this, my wife’s and I date night at the movies get fewer and fewer because there is nothing but pure garbage out (or she’s having an affair – not sure which).

        I’m over it though. Starting working on a draft right after I posted :). Thanks for the shout out.

        • klmn

          It might not be released in China. They limit the American films that can play there.

    • HRV

      What does J.C. have to do with it?

  • Poe_Serling

    “… horror IP travels well. What was scary 40 years ago can still
    be scary today.”

    How about an update/remake of The Ghost and Mr. Chicken?

    A rundown mansion, eerie organ music, a hidden staircase …
    a Barney Fife-type spending the night there.

    Hey…

    It scared me quite a bit when I first saw it as a kid on Saturday
    afternoon TV.

    Since its a Universal property, why not bring in some of their
    familiar talent from around the lot:

    James Wan producing/directing. Matt Damon as Luther Heggs.
    Vin Diesel as Mr. Simmons…

    ;-)

  • Devil.Fear.Dark.TRIO.GO

    After nearly 3 years, cooler heads prevail, heat dissipated, Dis. Program likely will be in turnaround and dropped.

  • PQOTD

    Slightly OT for today’s post, but better late than never – this one’s for you, Midnight! https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/dc196f1f8f26a0b1afb2d1dd89bfb81dd42695ad43d48043118b3100d1d926ac.jpg

    • Midnight Luck

      “sudden disgust” – “health antelopes”
      Love it. Thanks for that. Made me laugh.

      • PQOTD

        Excellent! One can never have too many laughs, imho. (And it’s Far Side – of course!)

    • Malibo Jackk

      Here’s looking at you Midnight.
      Give the girl a break.

  • scriptfeels

    The first one is a little strange since it’s a young mother but has a dead sECOND husband? Also, can i see this as a movie? is this a survival terrorist story or a widow detective story?

    Logline 2, im assuming the mother being chosen is the inciting incident. Do they drive her insane then ruin or her life or first ruin her life then drive her insane? Id probably use different words to convey the spurce of conflict. Her control of her life is sacrificed to become a master of rock scissor papers to determine the fate of the world. also including specifics about the type of intellegence communitty would help give me more interest if possible.

    Including the stakes of the r,s,p match might beef it up as well. I hope my notes are constructive. Tbh if it makes aow, id probably read it based on the strength of writing in the script and less so for the premises described here.

  • filmklassik

    Okay, what you see as a bug, I see as a feature. I LOVE that Austin’s abilities are grounded and completely science-based, which heightens the tension and the relatability. Means the guy can get hurt. And not by some super villain either. But by real people. Shooting real guns.

    The original TV show was cheesier than a double calzone, but the pilot movie was good, and the novel it was based on — “Cyborg,” by Martin Caidin — even better.

    And Caidin’s premise is unbelievably inventive.