Genre: Superhero!
Premise: An Amazonian Princess living on a remote island is brought to the real world, where she uses her unique set of powers to take down a mega-corporation with world domination on the brain (basically every comic-hero plot ever).
About: This is the Joss Whedon draft of Wonder Woman he wrote in 2006! Whedon, as many of you know, has left his DC buddies in the dust to become the head directing honcho of Marvel Universe with his Avengers films. To give you some context of the movie business when Whedon wrote this, the two big superhero films preceding this draft were 2005’s Batman Begins and 2004’s Spider-Man 2. Both films were considered dark (Batman moreso than Spider-Man of course) and so the dark realistic super-hero trend was beginning.
Writer: Joss Whedon
Details: 115 pages (2006 draft)

Wonder-Woman-Comics-Collage-by-Mike-Alcantara

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. Yay!!! Michael Bay is a kajillionaire. Can’t say I ever got into the whole mutant turtle thing. But I knew when Dr. Explosion decided to put his particular brand of vapidness on the turtle tale, I definitely wanted nothing to do with it.

I was rooting for Swetnam’s Into the Storm (spec script) to do some hurricane like damage at the box office, but it just goes to show how difficult it is to play with established properties (remember that spec script writers – it’s why your concept has to be really awesome for Hollywood to take notice). Into the Storm needed at least a couple of recognizable faces to sell the movie, like Twister and The Perfect Storm before it. I don’t think a storm by itself can do all the heavy box office lifting.

Speaking of storms, what happens when a Marvelnado and a DCunami meet? You’ll find out today. Whedon, the flagship director for the third biggest movie ever, Marvel’s Avengers, wasn’t always chummy chummy with the Marvel comic book family. He was once playing for the other team, scripting the DC script for Wonder Woman.

Stories like this always intrigue me. Because if Joss Whedon wrote a Wonder Woman script today, while he’s on top of the world with the biggest franchise in the world, everyone would be DESPERATE to read it. It would be the hottest script in town, right? So what changes if he wrote it eight years ago? Was Joss Whedon any worse of a writer? He may not have been a household name at the time, but he’s still the same guy. So why not use this script for a wonder woman movie. Say it’s written by Joss Whedon and everyone wins, right?

Well, that’s assuming he overcame the same problems everyone who’s been trying to adapt Wonder Woman over the decades has run into. Which is that her character’s not fit for today’s super hero audience. A lasso that makes people tell the truth? How dumb is that? It looks to me like they finally said fuck it and Zack Snyder is going to change the character to make her a straight-forward ass-kicking female, kind of like how he dropped the whole Clark Kent glasses reporter stuff. Screw history.

But what if Joss Whedon had been in charge. What would he have done? Let’s find out!

I don’t know if you knew this or not. But Wonder Woman is an Amazon. You know that legendary island full of tall beautiful ass-kicking ladies? Well it’s real. At least in this script it is. A pilot named Steve is bringing food and supplies to child refugees when his plane goes down and crash-lands on this Amazonian Island.

At first Steve goes looking for Jeff Bezos, but he ends up running into Diana instead. Diana is the Princess of the island. And when her mother, the queen, finds out that a man has entered the perimeter – a huge no-no on this island – she sentences him to death! (probably why Beznos is hiding)

But Diana’s developed a little bit of a crush on Steve, and challenges her mom to a duel for the right to help Steve get off this island and save the children! She ends up winning, and the two head off, where Diana learns the complicated multitudes of the real world, namely that when you deliver supplies to kids, a local warlord is going to want 75% of the goods for himself.

After the Warlord shoots Diana for questioning his motives, she gives him a taste of his own medicine, beating some ass, and Steve realizes he’s got something special here. So he takes Alice/Wonder Woman back to the U.S., to a crime-ridden city called Gateway, which I guess is Wonder Woman’s version of Gotham.

In Gateway, there’s this super-huge company called Spearhead that poses as a wonderful company that manufactures weapons to help the United States defend itself.

Wonder Woman, pissed that there’s so much lying and corruption in this city, takes it upon herself to work her way up the local gangster ladder to find out who’s ultimately responsible for all this crime. Using her truth lasso (which forces people to tell the truth), it eventually leads back to, you guessed it, Spearhead.

The problem is, Spearhead’s being protected by a super-human of its own, some freaky-faced metallic skull-capped dude named Strife who, oh yeah, just happens to be the nephew of Ares. Ares as in THE GOD OF WAR! Yup, craziness is happening all over. So if Wonder Woman is going to save the day, she’s basically going to have to defeat a God to do it.

I’m going to give Whedon this. He somehow made Wonder Woman cool. I thought there was no way around the whole truth-lasso thing. But Whedon doesn’t use it much, and when he does, it’s with attitude (for example, with one gangster, Wonder Woman slings the rope around his neck like an Indiana Jones whip, before asking him who he works for).

But the biggest reason this worked was that Whedon went all in. He committed to this character, to this world, to the rules of this universe. And I think that’s what you have to do with these scripts.

When amateur writers tackle comic material, they typically have a vague sense of the hero they liked growing up, then they use their own imagination to fill in the gaps, whether it be their heroine taking down a gangster or kicking ass in some big set piece fight. It all feels very thin, like a writer who really loves movies including all his favorite movie moments in one script.

When you read the opening of Wonder Woman, the detail involved in this Amazon tribe, where they came from, the hierarchy, the connections between the characters. It feels like Whedon really immersed himself in the comics and knew this world before he wrote anything. And when you do that, even if the world is silly and weird, the audience believes it, because you, the writer, have committed to it.

That’s one of the biggest differences I see between amateur and pro writers. Pros commit themselves to the world. Amateurs learn a little bit here, a little bit there, and think that’s enough.

I never really knew how good of a writer Joss Whedon was until this script actually. His writing always seems to have this immediacy, yet it never feels rushed. It creates this propelling motion as you’re reading, spinning you down from one paragraph to the next.

In amateur screenplays, it always feels like the writer is fighting his sentences, writing himself into corners he must clumsily write himself out of.

And I noticed that what Whedon is really good at, is that no matter how intense things get, he’s not afraid to undercut it with a joke to lighten the mood. For example, near the middle of the script, amongst a lot of chaos, a girl stops Wonder Woman and with giant puppy dog eyes says, “My cat’s stuck up in the tree.” Wonder Woman looks up at the cat, then back to the girl. “Climb it.” She then runs off. This is something Christopher Nolan can learn from the Firefly scribe.

The only weakness in the script is that no matter how skilled Whedon is, he can never get too far away from the fact that this is a super-hero movie. There are only so many surprises you can pull on the audience. It’s why I liked X-Men: First Class so much. Because for once, there was something different going on that we weren’t used to in the comic book world. It’s why Batman Begins made such a big splash when it came out. Because it approached the superhero genre from such a realistic place (Nolan’s got Whedon there). It’s why, I believe, Guardians of the Galaxy did so well. Because these weren’t your typical super-heroes and it wasn’t your typical super-hero movie.

Those movies found little black holes to slip into that took them to parallel universes which allowed them to tell a new story.  But Wonder Woman is stuck in the land of garden-variety comic book movies.  It tries to break out (the first act, away from the city, felt pretty unique), but ultimately is pulled back in (giant egomaniacal city villain alert).

I’m actually shocked that audiences haven’t grown tired of the genre yet because, like Wonder Woman here, we’re basically seeing the same movie over and over again.  So kudos to Whedon for writing what really is a cool script. It’s just too bad he was limited by the genre.

[ ] what the hell did I just read?
[ ] wasn’t for me
[x] worth the read
[ ] impressive
[ ] genius

What I learned: In fight scenes, it’s not as important to detail every punch or sword swing, as it is to give the reader a sense of what kind of fight it is. Tell us how each fighter fights, and we’ll be able to fill in the visual gaps ourselves. So when Wonder Woman fights her mother, Whedon writes: “Everywhere Diana strikes, Hippolyte counters. Diana tries to control the fight through youth and relentless strength, and though she responds with no less, Hippolyte relies on experience over enthusiasm.” Obviously, you’ll detail fight specifics after this, but sentences like this allow you to summarize pieces of the fight so you don’t have to detail. Every. Single. Swing.

  • MarkDee

    Hey there, long time lurker, never posted. It’s slightly off topic, but I was just wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of new screenplays? Since the Deadpool crackdown, it’s so hard to get your hands on screenplays! Is there a place that people trade them, or a website that I’m not aware of? Where are all of you getting your scripts from?!

    Thanks!

    M

    • Casper Chris

      Write To Reel.

      • MarkDee

        Write to Reel doesn’t work, I register, but it won’t let me download any files or post any threads…. do you have to be invited?

        • Casper Chris

          You have to wait for the administrators to verify your account. Can take a couple of days.

      • Ryan Sasinowski

        Hell Yeah!!! That and this site are the two best resources for screenwriters on the web.

    • Malibo Jackk

      Sharknado script is available online.

      • carsonreeves1

        Where??? I’ve been looking for it. What about Sharknado 2? Is that out there as well?

    • Scott Crawford

      The Tracking Board is where I get my scripts from. Not all of them. Just the specs. But that’s all you need. You don’t NEED to read the Deadpool script (I think I had it but lost it along with a bunch of other scripts I had – computer malfunction).

      Torrenting is still an option. Not that I’m advocating. i’m just saying.

      • Mike.H

        Scott or others, if ya’ll have Scott Frazier’s latest works such as HEAT SEEKER, DAY ONE, BERLINER, METRO 2033 please send. Yokejc100 at yahoo dot com. Thanks in advance!

        • Scott Crawford

          Check your e-mail.

      • Ryan Sasinowski

        I’ve got that one.

    • crazedwritr

      Scridx and writetoreel are good sources

  • Scott Crawford

    Very disappointed with the new Wonder Woman’s costume. Where’s the color? Where’s the originality? Ever since the first X-Men it’s been black and it’s been leather.

    Someone has to be the first to break the trend. Go on, give it a go! Colorful superheros! In lycra!

    • G.S.

      I agree. While I definitely wanted/was looking for gladiator-style leather armor, there was plenty of room to get away from the flat brown of what they settled with. Red, white, blue and gold all could be there in some way… but they went with brown. Blech.

      • Scott Crawford

        I know she’s an Amazon and it’s not gonna be all red-white-and blue (yet), but it seems that all comic book movies are now shot in near-darkness.

        I’m not sorry, but I really enjoyed comic book romps like The Phantom with Billy Zane. Why can’t we have something a bit more fun, halfway between that movie and what Marvel and D.C. are now producing?

  • andyjaxfl

    “It feels like Whedon really immersed himself in the comics and knew this world before he wrote anything.”

    Man, I wish Kurtzman and Orci had actually read a Spider-Man comic or seen a Star Trek movie/episode instead of just reading the Wikipedia pages on all of the characters before they wrote those horrendous scripts. They used the same MacGuffin in two separate franchises within a year of each other! That alone should be enough to damn them to Screenwriters Hell!!

    • carsonreeves1

      It’s so true. The Wikipedia Researched script is the worst. And 90% of the writers out there do it. That should be the beginning of your research, not the end.

      • Scott Crawford

        Researching the subject of a script recently, I found a lot of contradictory evidence – it was the sort of subject where a lot of mythology and conspiracy theory had grown around it. I found going back in time to the earliest source material gave me the answers I was looking for. Wikipedia’s OK for the simple facts, but for the details, you have to be prepared to do the legwork.

      • Nate

        I think if you need to research a city or a specific location or get a quick history lesson, then Wikipedia is a good place to go. One little thing that helped me is using travel guides to research a city, especially if your script is set mainly within that city.

        • Scott Crawford

          Wikipedia is a SECONDARY resource, maybe TERTIARY, made up of information from PRIMARY and SECONDARY sources (see, teacher, my education wasn’t entirely wasted.

          If you want to find the capital of Mali, Wikipedia’s great. But after reading (half of) that Catherine the Great script, then looking at the Wikipedia entry on Catherine the Great, it’s clear that the writer did a lot more research on her subject than was in the few paragraphs online.

          • crazedwritr

            can you forward me this script: moviegurl at me dot com

          • Scott Crawford

            Sorry, dude, which script. If it’s Wonder Woman, I haven’t got it.

          • Ryan Sasinowski

            Sent!

    • romer6

      Thank you! Someone else who thinks those Star Trek movies are anything but a Star Trek movie…

      • andyjaxfl

        The most frightening part is that Orci is back for Trek 3 as both writer and director. I’m trying not to be snarky, but it’s unavoidable: Trek 3 could very well end up being the worst Star Trek movie ever made. Orci’s crazy politics aside, I think he’s a bad storyteller.

        • Kirk Diggler

          I wouldn’t let Orci write a Christmas card to my mailman.

    • http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1888937/ Rick McGovern

      Didn’t like the spiderman movies much — the recent part two was much better than the first… but still left me wanting more.

      The two Star Trek films on the other hand, I enjoyed. I also give the writers some leeway in that, since they are following a different timeline now, experiencing different adventures and different people along the way, that the characters are not going to be the same characters from the original series. They are after all experiencing a much different life than if their futures were not diverted and ricocheted in a different direction.

      • Scott Crawford

        I loved the first Star Trek, but I felt the second one was too obviously trying to be politically-relevant, to the extent of making the villains into prats (that’s right; in England, “prat” is an insult).

        Couldn’t be arsed to watch Spider-Man 2 after Spider-Man 1 left too many questions unanswered.

        • http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1888937/ Rick McGovern

          I am glad I wasn’t the only one who didn’t like the 1st Spider-Man

          • Scott Crawford

            I liked some of the effects, but I watch a movie for some sort of resolution – it should have been called The Amazing Spider-Man Part 1 for all the loose ends.

      • andyjaxfl

        I’m with Scott — I enjoyed, but didn’t love, the first one despite a few obvious plot/story holes, but I think the Wrath of Khan remake is a polished turd that wasted an extraordinary cast and repeated the exact same story arc for the main character as the previous movie.

        I like how the Kirk, Spock, Bones, Uhura and the rest of the crew are different characters than presented in the original timeline. I just think the behind-the-camera talent, some of which is remaining for Trek 3, is pedestrian and hellbent on referencing iconic images, stories, and moments from the original timeline instead of trying to spin something familiar into new territory, which is what a good remake should do.

        • http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1888937/ Rick McGovern

          I wouldn’t have brought Khan back either… I would have investigated the world and brought something new to the table. With that said, the second Star Trek still didn’t bother me that much. Actually like it better the second time.

          In any case, definitely better than the Spider-Mans.

        • Kirk Diggler

          “Khaaaaaaaaan!!” said the wrong character. It wasn’t supposed to make me laugh but it did.

  • Cuesta

    Hey, if someone has the script, please share it with me:
    operaciones@gmail.com
    Wanted to read this sometime ago but didn’t find it :(

    • Mike.H

      I’d like a copy as well. yokejc100 AT YAHOO DOT COM. Thanks!

      • Ryan Sasinowski

        Sent!

  • G.S.

    I must have this screenplay. If anyone finds it, please forward to gsphifer (at) hotmail (dot) com.

    • Ryan Sasinowski

      Got it. Sent! Enjoy.

  • G.S.

    For a Joss Whedon screenplay, this sounds immensely “safe.” Somewhat surprising, but given the pre-superhero boom period in which it was written, I suppose it could be considered a product of its time. I’ve been wanting to get my hands on this for a while, though.

    In contrast to DC’s hit-or-miss live-action theatrical releases, their direct-to-DVD animated movies have been pretty consistent in their awesomeness. In fact, I think with a few costuming changes and minor script tweaks, the 2009 Wonder Woman animated feature could be done almost shot-for-shot in live action and make a killing. Has anyone else seen it? Am I wrong?

    On a different note, I have a problem with the oft-repeated notion of one story simply being a rehashing of another story necessarily being a bad thing. We’re fooling ourselves if we think we’re actually creating a story that’s never been told. It’s way too late in human history to claim originality in that regard. Isn’t the idea of genre rooted in the fact that a certain type of story has been done before? Don’t we have archetypes because the “repetitive” characterizations work? We shouldn’t be surprised or disappointed when a plot summary looks the same as its predecessors. We should be, however, when the execution of that story has no originality. Isn’t that what we mean when we ask for “the same, but different” movies?

    I don’t know. Maybe I’m being overly sensitive about it. But I’ve seen this criticism a whole lot lately, and it keeps striking me as a sort of cop-out to the more specific problems of a piece.

  • Scott Strybos

    I want to see a Wonder Woman film where she is answering phones and getting coffee for the Justice Society.

    • Scott Crawford

      That is the greatest thing I have ever seen! More here:
      http://www.superdickery.com/

      • Scott Strybos

        Wonder Woman talking sense.

  • Mike.H

    big fan of Wonder woman. Please send PDF to yokejc100 AT YAHOO DOT COM. Thank you.

    • Ryan Sasinowski

      Sure thing. Sent!

  • Sina

    For anyone who is looking for this script, it’s on Scridx. Just do a search for “Wonder Woman” and it should turn up. Don’t know how long it’s going to be posted there so you might want to download it ASAP.

    • romer6

      Thanks a lot!

    • Guest

      Nice. Can help to with this
      “Wonder Woman” joss

    • JakeBarnes12

      Thanks, Sina. Looking forward to this one.

  • B.S. Eliot

    Carson,

    You should really check out Whedon’s Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I have been a fan of his since I discovered the how (not the awful movie). The episodes written by Joss are among the best in the history of genre TV. Joss also pitched DC on his take for Batman, before Nolan got the job.

    I would LOVE to read Wonder Woman. I’ve been trying to find this and Avengers with no luck. Anyone kind enough to send me a copy? danielgoodfoot at gmail. Thanks.

    • Ryan Sasinowski

      Sent!

  • Casper Chris

    That’s odd. I would try re-registering.

  • Logline_Villain

    Don’t recall reading the FIRST PAGE of a script where the double standard between pro and amateur was so evident, to wit:

    – 3 uses of the word buck(s) – once where a plane bucks bravely – in addition to issue re: word variety, it also begs the question: Are planes brave?

    – 2 uses of the word crackle(s) (once to describe lightning and the other to describe radio static)

    – A “we see” and “we hear” in the opening 2 blocks of action

    – A camera ANGLE

    – Dialogue that is HIGHLIGHTED (“lost at sea”)

    – Use of (continuing) in a wrylie when character speaks on consecutive occasions…

    Granted, this is the talented Joss Whedon. Granted, this is a 2006 script…

    And if this were an AOW submission by someone not named Joss Whedon the writer in all likelihood would have been taken to task for the above…

    • walker

      That is a great observation LV. Pull back to reveal that the double standard is an enormous monster.

    • GoIrish

      I gave up when i came across three adverbs within two lines (top of p.16).

      • Mike.H

        Golrish, you’ve stated your distaste for adverbs succinctly, admirably and completely. Well done, agreed.

    • pmlove

      2 uses of the word static too.

    • Scott Crawford

      Spot on, Logline Villain. Once again it’s worth repeating, just cause (INSERT WRITER’S NAME HERE) does it, doesn’t mean you can too. Whedon has earned the right to add camera angles. Whedon has earned the right to make mistakes (this script would originally have been read by far fewer people than an amateur spec script). Amateur spec writers haven’t earned those rights yet.

      Once again, Catherine the Great spec script, page 8: “… war is eminent”.

      • IgorWasTaken

        Scott Crawford wrote: “Amateur spec writers haven’t earned those rights yet.

        I disagree.

        Sure, they “haven’t earned those rights” according to some who post here. But as long as “ANGLE” is used correctly, and as long as it and other stuff aren’t combining to bog the action down to a slog, then – IMO, BFD.

        • Scott Crawford

          Yeah, it doesn’t bother me too much if someone says ANGLE, or “what he sees”. A few times. I think what bothered Logline Villain and some others was how the first page is plastered with such things.

        • Malibo Jackk

          Have to believe that some of this feeds on itself.
          Someone takes a class/ reads a book on screenwriting — and is told
          that something is improper. They in turn look for these violations and point them out every time they see them. To make matters worse, some become professional readers and think it’s their job to point out each time they occur. But they only dare mention this to amateurs.

          Here’s what you need to know: everything in moderation.
          (Unfortunately, your script will be judged by readers who won’t allow any deviation. They’re convinced that it’s their job.)

    • Malibo Jackk

      “And if this were an AOW submission by someone not named Joss Whedon the
      writer in all likelihood would have been taken to task for the above…”

      Someday Carson is going to play this trick on us all.

    • IgorWasTaken

      Normally I wouldn’t raise this, but since you are picking nits here (fairly, I hasten to add), you might want to reconsider your use of “begs the question” – which you’ve done colloquially, though “the experts” would say wrongly.

    • http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1888937/ Rick McGovern

      I think “rules” can get in the way of actually enjoying a script. None of the things you brought up bothered me… except the highlighted sections, and that’s because as a SAG actor (if I were playing Steve), he’s telling me how to act.

      But if you’re too stuck on the “rules” you’re reading as a critic, vs someone who is just trying to enjoy a good story. And that’s not saying that rules aren’t important, I just think some are more important than others.

      • IgorWasTaken

        I have to ask. I did up-vote your comment, but this thing about “telling me how to act” seems nutty. Yes, I do get it at some level.

        But, have you ever had a line like, “This is the most important thing in the world to me”, but you delivered it as “To me, this is the most important in the world”?

        As a writer, I may highlight a word because it simply makes the sentence easier to read – to get the basic meaning.

        I was talking about you.
        I was talking about you.

        Or I might highlight it because I want the actor to know that, to me, that word is important. That if it’s said with emphasis, it will emphasize something that I think is important to the character. Or simply that fleshes out my vision of the story.

        I might set the story in Chicago and say the lead actor is tall and fat, and the story might be shifted to Omaha with a lead actor who’s short and fat.

        And so why, as an actor, do you feel that an emphasized word is somehow anything more than a suggestion, just as Chicago, tall, and fat are also just suggestions?

        • http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1888937/ Rick McGovern

          Depends on the context and how often it’s used… I underline, too, but very seldom. And sometimes, I don’t know if you actually need to. If it’s well written, I think the actor will pick up on it anyway. And then they’ll make sure they do anything but the suggestion, just because it was suggested. I’m not like that of course lol

          It also doesn’t bother me as much as most actors (maybe because I’m a writer, too?).

          Most actors don’t like it because it’s like the writer is telling the actor how to say the line. Or how to interpret the line. Or sometimes what the character’s motivation is.

          They also don’t like the (parenthetical), and a lot of actors simply just cross them out, some without even reading them. Some acting schools teach you to cross them out.

          By the way, every time I see your name, I also think of the band Sepultura lol if you’ve heard of ‘em.

          • IgorWasTaken

            Thanks for the reply and insights.

            Now, moving on… If my big problem as a writer is me writing

            (grinning) Fuck you!

            but the actor delivering it as

            (snarling) Fuck you!

            … I’ll take it.

            And besides. At that point, it’s the director’s problem.

          • Malibo Jackk

            Shouldn’t we know that most of the time our scripts are written for
            the reader (not the actor).

            It’s not a shooting script.
            (There’s a lot of confusion about what a script should serve. A movie outline? An emotional experience for the reader? Character and plot? A demonstration of screenwriting rules? A lesson in grammar and spelling?)

          • charliesb

            Most actors don’t like it because it’s like the writer is telling the actor how to say the line. Or how to interpret the line. Or sometimes what the character’s motivation is.

            Too me, this is the writer’s job. On set, a director can give license to the actor to do whatever they want. But the writer has a vision and it should be there on paper. I don’t want an actor deciding what the character’s motivation is. I want them to focus on getting the motivation I have written across on screen.

          • http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1888937/ Rick McGovern

            In the end, it’s the director’s vision, not the writer’s. So unless your vision is the same as the director’s, I wouldn’t get my hopes up. But not that I wouldn’t try either lol

            Example of two writer’s I’m friends with that had their movies made. One where the writer and the director were on the same page, and the other where they weren’t.

            One: Pompeii. Only 60 percent of their vision made it to the screen, the rest changed during re-writes to give what the director wanted.

            Two: Cake. Almost his entire script made it to the screen, which a couple changes because of budget and what they could get.

            And most director’s don’t tell an actor how to act or where to find their motivation.

            I had a part on Public Enemies (which was cut unfortunately :/ along with a bunch of other scenes from those couple of days of filming) and Michael Mann let me do my thing, as he did Johnny Depp and Stephen Dorff (no Christian Bale on the days I worked). Not that he didn’t give notes in between takes, but for the most part, he just let us do our thing.

            Of course, he was one of three writer’s on the film, but I think he came in after the script was already written. But not sure.

          • sotiris5000

            Interesting stories, so thank you. I’d just like to point out your misuse of apostrophes. You never use an apostrophe when you are pluralising something.

    • CRAYONSEED

      I’m late to the party here, but I think it’s also worth noting the Whedon typically directs as well. He may have written this with the idea that it was more the blueprint for his movie than the a script for others to digest.

  • klmn

    “A lasso that makes people tell the truth? How dumb is that?”

    That’s not dumb at all, Carson. It just needs updating. She can still tie people up with her golden rope.

    But she does need a few more accessories. A whip of some kind – maybe a riding crop. Or a sjambok. Hell, give her a whole collection of whips.

    And an electric cattle prod.

  • walker

    Not really interested in this type of thing. But I do frequently wonder about women.

  • Brainiac138

    Very nice What I Learned section, Carson. I’ve read several scripts that had whole fight scenes completely choreographed, and took up several pages, when in reality, they wouldn’t last more than 45 secs-1 minute, tops.

    • Scott Crawford

      Tom Mankiewicz came up with the idea for the boat chase in Live and Let Die, but for a while his script just said: SCENE 146 – The greatest boat chase ever filmed! At some point before filming, Mank realized he had to WRITE that boat chase, and he did – every jump, every crash.

      You don’t want to write every punch, kick, or shot, but you do have to write the SPECIFICS that make the setpiece unique.

    • klmn

      Hmm. Now I have to look at the script for Rocky.

  • Ryan Sasinowski

    Sent

  • Midnight Luck

    So, once again, I seem to be one of the only ones who is going to be negative about this one.

    No I haven’t read it, I am only going off of Carson’s review here, so I understand it has to be taken with a grain of salt.

    But, seriously, this “Plot” and script sound just plain Stupid.

    What is it about?
    It sounds like a bunch of different Episodes strung haphazardly together for Big Set Pieces, and for no other reason than the writer decided we needed something else to happen, and we needed another Big event or the story might stall (pretty much like every single other Cape and Captain Flick).

    Maybe it is just how Carson covered the story here, maybe it is put together with a bit more nuance and the story actually has a lot more depth than this shows.

    I know many of you, including Carson, are just In Love with Joss Whedon (and JJ) and everything he does, so this gets an automatic Love, Love, Love In session. Yet I still think it would be better if people could separate their personal feelings from it all and read it as if they had no idea who was writing it. I can’t tell if this got a good review because the writing was top notch (I sincerely doubt it, it sounds terrible) or if is just the reader was in love with what the writer has done before and who he is in the larger world of Hollywood (I suspect this is closer to truth).

    Now true, I have not been a fan of any of the writing, story, or production of a single Spandex movie since THE DARK KNIGHT (and that one only worked for the sole reason that Heath Ledger was Crazy and Awesome and kept it afloat). NONE, and I mean NONE of the rest of the any of the spandex movies have Anything remotely interesting or good about them.

    Don’t get me wrong, I am all behind having a Female In Charge movie knock it out of the park, especially in the Spandex Universe we all find ourselves trapped in. But this just doesn’t sound like it does any of it justice. There is a problem to begin with though, that Wonder Woman herself isn’t interesting from the get go. She doesn’t have a PERSONALITY to start, she doesn’t have any incredible powers, doesn’t even seem to have a good backstory. So either you scrap it all from the Comic books and rewrite history, or else you find tiny jewels hidden here and there in her story and Amp it up.

    I would rather see the whole story told INSIDE the AMAZON, instead of just arbitrarily bringing her back to some fake GOTHAM like world and then having to fight off some unknown random BAD GUY (and if it is a Corporation, well Corporations aren’t people (even though they want you to believe they are) and therefore, incredibly uninteresting) she in all likelihood could give a shit about. Yes there is some vague tie in to her fighting this same bad guy back in her homeland, but that makes as much sense as…. well nothing actually. It again just sounds like Convenience Writing. She is fighting the same guy, and / or the same Corporation and Guy as she was in the Amazon? Come on, try harder, dig deeper. That is just bad writing, poor storytelling.

    Where’s the GSU? What is her goal in the beginning? Why is anything happening?

    It bores me to think about reading the script, but I guess I need to. I fear my distaste for all these scripts will be worsened by doing this, not bettered though.

    • cjob3

      Gotta say, the plot synopsis read like Catwoman- fighting Sharon Stone as the head of a huge cosmetics company.

      That said, if anyone has a copy of the script… cjob3(AT)hotmail. I couldn’t find the Whedon version online.

    • pmlove

      It also sounds dull because there’s no character change for Wonder Woman – just physical displacement. It’s more Crocodile Dundee than origins story. That means it isn’t her battle, which means I don’t care.

      I liked the Batmans (although the Liam Neeson bit of Batman Begins was dull compared to the build up and the third one felt a lot like the first) because it was all Bruce Wayne. He has motive, an epic struggle with how to cope and deal with his troubles before we get to the boring superhero bit.

      This (sounds like it) skips that and goes for an ‘all the strong women must be stuck on an island somewhere’, then a bit of Mick Dundee. Boring boring boring.

    • andyjaxfl

      The first act is pretty good and sets up the world nicely, but as cjob3 points out below, it basically becomes a better version of Catwoman after. Whether or not some of those scenes were mandated by execs I do not know. I think Carson’s rating is fair because it’s a mid-level/average, and ultimately forgettable, script about a pretty interesting character, I think.

      • Scott Crawford

        How strong a position was Whedon in at this time? Buffy was over, Firefly had been cancelled, Serenity hadn’t soared at the box office.

        I’m asking ’cause I really don’t know. Now, 2014, if Whedon wants to make a six-hour remake of Meet Joe Black Hollywood’ll give him the money. But in 2006…

        • andyjaxfl

          It has the Whedon feel more often that not, but the parts that feel studio mandated are the weakest part. I don’t think everything Whedon touches is gold, but I do believe he knows how to navigate cliche (which studio notes tend to be) better than most.

          I think if he was given $200-million and carte blanche (story wise) to make a WW movie without any studio interference, we’d see some changes to Acts 2 & 3 of today’s script.

    • Scott Crawford

      Maybe (maybe) Whedon was just “laying it all out” in this draft, showing the execs what they could play with. It’s unlikely, I know, but it’s possible. Not every script you find on line is the “Final Draft” with all the i’s dotted and the t’s crossed.

      • Midnight Luck

        Maybe….doubtful….but, maybe

    • charliesb

      First I agree that a lot people seem to give JJ* and Whedon a lot of love, even for work that isn’t up to snuff in my opinion (Super 8, Agents of Shield), but I don’t think that’s what Carson is doing here. Clearly superhero movies aren’t your thing (which is cool) but I do want to talk a bit about this:

      Wonder Woman herself isn’t interesting from the get go. She doesn’t have a PERSONALITY to start, she doesn’t have any incredible powers, doesn’t even seem to have a good backstory.

      On the surface, all superhero’s (and villains) aren’t very interesting, but viewing them from the right angle is all the difference.

      If you look at the basic description of Superman (a character I’ve only come to really love as an adult**). He’s a super powered being that lives in a big city and occasionally punches evil to death. He has a bit of drama in that he’s the last son of Krypton, was sent to earth in a space ship and that he masks his identity with a pair of eye glasses.

      But what actually makes him an interesting character (at least IMO) is not that he can fly or shoot lasers out of his eyes, or that his planet blew up cause no one believed in global warming, but that he grew up in Kansas. The most powerful being on earth, grew up in a small town (with the best parents ever) and everything he does, thinks, wants and hopes for, is due to that upbringing. It’s the fact that Clark Kent is the man and Superman the mask, it’s the idea that no matter what he does, he’ll never really fit in. It’s the fact that despite his desire to be a beacon of hope for the planet, as he rushes across the planet to save one person, he’ll always hear the cries of someone he didn’t save in the background.

      Now fine on the surface Diana is a beautiful women with similar abilities to Superman and a nifty piece of rope. But again with the right person writing there is an interesting story to be told. Gender politics, family drama and her very black and white view of right and wrong all make her an interesting character. Her ties to Greek mythology also give her a great history and backstory to pull from. I also think that the opposing extremely violent and hugely compassionate sides of her personality are ripe with conflict and can make for interesting storytelling.

      Now I haven’t read this screenplay, and Carson’s review didn’t exactly excite me, but I don’t think the character is the problem. I just don’t buy into the “not an interesting character” thing.

      Characters are interesting because we write them that way. If a character makes it to screen and bores it’s the fault of the writer (or meddling producers) not because they don’t have flashy powers or an epic origin story.

      BTW – I also wasn’t very impressed with the Batman movies except Ledger who was flawless. They took everything I loved about Batman/Bruce and watered it down like a Coors fucking Light.

      *Full disclosure, I really love JJ, and while I don’t like all his work, when he’s on point, he’s ridiculously on point, and so I will give him the benefit of the doubt and check out anything he does.
      **All Star Superman is my shit

      • Midnight Luck

        I absolutely agree with what you have said.
        I never read any Wonder Woman comics as a kid. I honestly don’t know much about her at all. I think she can spin around real fast like a tornado or something, she can knock bullets away with her metal wristbands, and she has a magical lasso (which I didn’t even know).

        I added that she didn’t really have superpowers or a good backstory as other big reasons I saw for her story not being that interesting. I am not saying their Powers are what make them interesting, but they ADD to the interest. Their backstory does add interest, as does the basic personality of Who They Are as people. The big thing that bothered me was she has always lacked that strong Personality. I agree, the fault is that of the writers and producers who created the TV show and anything else we have seen or read about her.

        Still when you think of Superman or Batman and if someone were to ask you to say 3 words to describe who they are, I think it would be easy. Superman: Loyal, honest, protector (or kind). Batman: Honest, Relentless, Damaged. Well, I am sure others would come up with different thoughts. The thing is, it takes no time to say them, because we KNOW.

        Wonder Woman? Big Breasts. Oh wait, no that was Lynda Carter, that wasn’t Wonder Woman’s personality. Well, maybe it was since she is an Amazonian Princess. I think they all have unusually large Breasts, right? Like this comic I got at some point Zombies vs. Robots vs. Amazons (see image below).

        Ok, so what about her personality? I know the main reason I can’t come up with anything is she isn’t in the minds of people, she hasn’t been used and pushed on us in the same way as BAT, SUPER, or SPIDER men. So we have nowhere near the same cultural reference. But still, if she was created as distinctly, as powerfully, as interestingly as the three of them, I believe we all would know about her.

        So, I just hope they create a very interesting personality for her, one that sticks and becomes part of everyones idea of her as a character.

        I hope she is an interesting character, becomes an interesting character, and that the final incarnation of her in the movie keeps me entertained and intrigued.

  • Midnight Luck

    HOLY SHIT !

    Robin Williams dead at 63.

    This is just so, so, so not ok.
    What the HELL happened?

    • Hadley’s Hope

      Jesus!

      I’m stunned. I can’t think of anything to say.

    • Bluedust

      Just heard it. Seems impossible.

    • charliesb

      I read it’s a suicide. Terrible news.

      • Midnight Luck

        Suicide, Drug overdose, etc.
        What is up with all these famous people? (Ledger, Hoffman, Williams)

        Such a waste.

        Trust me, I know all too well that life is a mother f’r, and hard as hell;
        but I have no doubt it will all be over way too soon, on it’s own accord.

        No need to help quicken it.

        • klmn

          Creativity, depression, and substance abuse often go together in a kind of unholy trinity.

          • Midnight Luck

            Should probably stay away from being creative then.

          • klmn

            It’s a curse. You don’t get to choose.

          • walker

            Well then my creativity should manifest itself pretty soon.

          • klmn

            You’ve impressed me, both with your wit and your background.

        • Casper Chris

          This TED talk seems fitting here:

          http://www.ted.com/talks/elizabeth_gilbert_on_genius#t-234402

          Really good btw.

  • Ryan Sasinowski

    Sure thing. Sent!

  • Hadley’s Hope

    He was truly a versatile actor. Comedy, obviously, but dramas and thrillers too. I feel that his ability to work in the thriller genre was underrated. One Hour Photo, Insomnia, and The Final Cut all contain solid thriller performances by Williams. I’ll admit that Nolan’s remake of Insomnia didn’t tickle my fancy, but Williams was good in it.

  • Casper Chris

    Robin Williams found dead. Such a loss. RIP.

  • lesbiancannibal

    Jesus, thank god they chose Nolan for Batman – Act 1 of this reads like a cross between Tales of the Golden Monkey and California Man.

  • Ryan Sasinowski

    Sent!

  • Ryan Sasinowski

    Sent!

  • Ryan Sasinowski

    Sure thing. Sent!

  • Ryan Sasinowski

    You got it! Sent!

  • Taylor

    Where do I download the screenplay?